Florida is among the worst states for drivers — or are we the best?

Let’s get this settled once and for all: Florida is among the worst states for drivers.

Oh no, wait — we actually have some of the best drivers?

One recent report says Florida is one of the worst states for drivers, while another says we have the second-best drivers in the U.S. ... Huh? (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
One recent report says Florida is one of the worst states for drivers, while another says we have the second-best drivers in the U.S. … Huh? (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A new report from Bankrate says Florida is the ninth-worst state for drivers. But that report comes less than two weeks after one from Quotewizard that Florida had the second-best drivers in the U.S., after only Rhode Island.

» RELATED: Study: Florida drivers second best in U.S. Pause for laughter.

So if our drivers are so good, why is the state so bad for them? In determining Florida’s ranking, Bankrate looked at average commute times; average yearly car insurance, repair and fuel costs; rate of car thefts related to population; and the number of car crash fatalities related to the number of miles driven. The average Florida commute is about 27 minutes, and we pay more than $1,100 a year on average for car insurance, and more than $1,000 yearly for gas. Compare that to Bankrate’s No. 1, Iowa, which has higher gas costs but much lower commute times and annual insurance costs.

Quotewizard did its ranking by looking at similar data, but with a few additions, including traffic citations, crashes, DUI arrests and speeding tickets.

Gigi Hadid perfectly summing up our feelings on Florida drivers. (Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images)
Gigi Hadid perfectly summing up our feelings on Florida drivers. (Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images)

Two other states as examples:

• Iowa was ranked first in Bankrate’s report, but solidly in the middle of the pack at 29th by Quotewizard.

• California seems to be the one state on which both analyses agree: While Bankrate put the Golden State in last place, Quotewizard said it has the second-worst drivers.

So this juxtaposition may still be possible: Florida could have good drivers — but just be a really bad place for them.

Check out the full ranking from Bankrate

 

Fewer than one-in-four Americans plans to shop in stores on Black Friday

Younger millennials love Black Friday the most.
Younger millennials love Black Friday the most.

If you’re a Black Friday shopper, it’s possible the crowds will be smaller this year.

Fewer than one-in-four Americans plans to shop in stores on Black Friday, according to a new Bankrate.com report released Tuesday.

Only 23 percent of consumers say they will shop in stores the day after Thanksgiving, down from 28 percent when Bankrate asked the same question in 2014.

Slightly more than half, or 53 percent, of Americans say they do not plan to shop at all on Thanksgiving, Black Friday or Cyber Monday.

There’s no need to, with deals and discounts being offered constantly.

“With ample discounts being offered by retailers well before Thanksgiving and additional bargains found throughout December, fewer people  are inclined to get up at ridiculous hours and wait in lengthy ines for the possibility to save a few extra dollars,” said Bankrate.com personal finance analyst Mike Cetera.

Who is the most enthusiastic about Black Friday? That would be younger millennials ages 18 to 25, with 37 percent of those surveyed saying they will shop in stores that day and 38 percent saying they will shop online that day. The same age group is  also the most likely to shop on Cyber Monday, at 37 percent.

The survey conduced by Princeton Survey Research Associates  is based on telephone interviews by landline and cell phone with a nationally representative sample of 1,000 adults living in the continental U.S.

For more information, click here.

 

What’s the biggest threat to the economy? Guess what Americans said.

Americans have anxiety over this.
Americans are worried about this.

What do a majority of Americans see as the biggest threat to the U.S. economy over the next six months?

The presidential election was named by six out of 10 Americans among every age group, income group, ethnic group, political affiliation and regardless of gender, a study released Tuesday by Bankrate.com found.

Coming in second was terrorism at 12 percent, followed by struggling overseas economies at 9 percent, a decline in the stock market at 8 percent and an increase in interest rates at 5 percent.

To view the survey results go to:
http://www.bankrate.com/finance/consumer-index/financial-security-charts-0916.aspx
“When Americans were asked about the biggest risk to the U.S. economy, the landslide winner was the outcome of the presidential election, garnering 61 percent of the vote and five times more votes than the second choice – terrorism,” said Bankrate.com Chief Financial Analyst Greg McBride, CFA.