Loxahatchee couple granted intervenor status in FPL rate case

PSC Commissioner Lisa Edgar has ruled that Alexandria and Daniel Larson may intervene in FPL's rate case.

PSC Commissioner Lisa Edgar has ruled that Alexandria and Daniel Larson may intervene in FPL’s rate case.

Daniel and Alexandria Larson, a  Loxahatchee couple  Florida Power & Light Co. had sought to ban from fully participating in its upcoming rate case has been granted intervenor status.

Florida Public Service Commissioner Lisa Edgar, who is the prehearing officer for FPL’s proposed $1.34 billion rate increase request, issued the order Tuesday.

The PSC is scheduled to hold hearings in Tallahassee for two weeks starting Aug. 22. Intervenors have the right to call and cross-examine witnesses and more in the case that will be run similarly to a trial.

Edgar wrote in the order that the Larsons meet the two-prong standing test established in a 1981 case. They are customers of FPL, and they will be substantially affected by the proceeding.

“Additionally, this Commission has a long history of granting intervention to residential customers of utilities subject to its regulation,” Edgar wrote.

FPL attorney John Butler objected to the Larsons intervening in the case because he said,  they alleged no substantial interests that are unique or are not being addressed by other intervenors.

The Office of Public Counsel, which represents all ratepayers, AARP, the Federal Executive Agencies and the Florida Industrial Power Users Group have also intervened and addressed the same issues as the Larsons, Butler wrote.

Edgar stated she does not find it necessary for the Larsons to specifically allege which of their specific interests OPC may or may not represent.

“I’m happy they granted intervention,” said Nathan Skop, a former PSC commissioner who is  the Larson’s attorney.

In 2012 FPL lost a similar effort to keep the Larsons from participating as intervenors in that rate case.

FPL spokeswoman Sarah Gatewood said the company has no further comment and does not plan to appeal the order.

 

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